This Week's R E V I E W ...

The Crusaders
Free As The Wind
© MCA

May 12 - 18, 2024

Year of Release: 1977
Rating:
  • Free As The Wind
  • I Felt The Love
  • The Way He Was
  • Nite Crawler
  • Feel It
  • Sweet N' Sour
  • River Rat
  • It Happens Everyday

  • See how this album ranks...


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    The Jazz Fusion group The Crusaders returns this week, with their #1 album from 1977, Free As The Wind. Their previous reviewed albums - The 2nd Crusade, and Images both received excellent reviews (3 stars). The Crusaders are definitely a great jazz band to listen to, and discover, if you are not familiar with their music. Both albums reviewed, likewise this week's Free As The Wind all reached #1 on Billboard's Jazz Albums chart.

    The title track leads off the album, and of course, it's another great sound of Jazz. "I Felt The Love" is just simply... SMOOOOOTH... "The Way He Was" is upbeat, groovin'. "Nite Crawler" is another great Jazz sounding track, groovin' with the flow. "Feel It" definitely has the feel, of great Jazz. IT also has a cool R&B feel. Ultimate (great) Jazz is the sound of "Sweet N' Sour" - definitely sweet, not sour. And Jazz just is great as it always was, on "River Rat." Ending the album is the lounge jazz sounding "It Happens Everyday." Beautiful.

    The Crusaders' Free As The Wind is another great album of pure Jazz. It's no wonder, just as the other albums reviewed here by them, that they are exceptional, and deserving to be #1. Explore the great sounds of Jazz on this album. You'll truly enjoy it.





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