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Kenny Loggins
"Yesterday Today Tomorrow: The Greatest Hits Of Kenny Loggins"

© Columbia

May 31 - 06, 2020

Year of Release: 1997
Rating:
  • This Is It
  • Whenever I Call You Friend
  • Footloose
  • Heart To Heart
  • Danger Zone
  • Meet Me Half Way
  • I'm Alright
    (Theme From Caddyshack)
  • Return To Pooh Corner
  • Don't Fight It
  • Forever
  • Conviction Of The Heart
  • The Real Thing
  • For The First Time
  • Celebrate Me Home
  • The Rest Of Your Life

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    A B C D E F G H I J K L M
    N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    My first knowledge of Kenny Loggins, was when he was with Jim Messina: Loggins & Messina. Their biggest hit I remembered was "Your Mama Don't Dance" (co-written by Loggins & Messina). "Danny's Song" was another one (written by Loggins), but most remembered that song by Anne Murray. Loggins of course, would endure a very successful career as a solo artist. This greatest hits collection, Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow: The Greatest Hits Of Kenny Loggins was a later release, and it basically has all the hits that Kenny had, and these hits are the ones we remember.

    The movie hits is probably THE most remembered of all: "Footloose" from the movie of the same name, "Danger Zone" (from Top Gun), "I'm Alright" (from Caddyshack). Other movie songs for Kenny: "For The First Time" (from One Fine Day), "Meet Me Half Way" (from Over The Top). [These two songs are probably not his "most remembered" as his other ones.] In comparing "Meet Me Half Way," Richard Marx comes to mind. "For The First Time" was #1 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart, in 1997.

    Another artist I kinda get confused with Kenny, is Michael McDonald. "Heart To Heart" definitely has the style of the solo McDonald, yet the vocalization of Kenny's is higher, than that of McDonald's. No doubt, Michael McDonald could easily have recorded this song himself, or maybe a duet, with Kenny. And speaking of duets, Kenny and Fleetwood Mac's Stevie Nicks recorded a great tune of the 1970s, "Whenever I Call You Friend," another huge hit for Kenny, likewise having Stevie with him for the duet, it's one of the finest duet songs of the 1970s decade. (Another one for Nicks of course, was her duet with Tom Petty -- "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around.")

    "Return To Pooh Corner" goes back to one of the Loggins & Messina tunes -- "House On Pooh Corner." A great tune by L&M, Kenny goes back years later, to Pooh Corner. Just as the original, he records the return just as great. It was the title of his 1994 album. In 2000, he released another album with this title -- More Songs From Pooh Corner. And another duet for Kenny, Steve Perry (of Journey)

    As for the rest, they are (mostly) tunes from Kenny's later career, to 1997. "Forever" is a nice ballad. It was also in the short film, Access All Areas, directed by Jenny Sullivan. "Conviction Of The Heart" and "The Real Thing" were from his 1991 album, Leap Of Faith. "Conviction" has a comparison of Christian artist Michael W. Smith. This song was dubbed "the unofficial anthem of the environmental movement" by Vice President Al Gore. The famous producer David Foster helped out on this album. With the title of Leap Of Faith both songs from this album could be Christian songs. However at the time, Loggins released this album after his divorce.

    "For The First Time" (the #1 Adult Contemporary song for Kenny) was produced by Peter Asher. Why does this name ring memory bells? He was part of the 1960s duo, Peter & Gordon. He would later become a manager and record producer. Among his credits: Linda Ronstadt's (manager/producer), James Taylor, J.D. Souther, Andrew Gold, Bonnie Raittfs (producer). "Celebrate Me Home" is the title track from Kenny's solo debut (1972). It was co-produced by another famous producer, Phil Ramone (who produced Billy Joel). The last song, "The Rest Of Your Life" is from his 1997 album, The Unimagineable Life. Kenny's distinctive voice is heard on this one, a nice Pop-sounding track. The album title was based on a book he had written with his second wife, Julia. The album was co-produced by Loggins, along with Randy Jackson (former judge on American Idol).

    Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow: The Greatest Hits Of Kenny Loggins is a great compilation of Kenny's hits, throughout his career, up to 1997. My only complaint (and a minor one), would be the songs were not in chronological order. But, his most-remembered solo hits are here, especially his movie tunes. Loggins would have a much successful solo career than that of Jim Messina. Messina was a member of two bands: Buffalo Springfield, and Poco. Messina has had solo albums of his own, but not as popular as Loggins.

    More solo albums were released after 1997 for Kenny Loggins, from 1998 to 2009 (six). There hasn't been any huge hits from these albums, yet he still performs. His appearance is more grayer now. We all remembered him with his dark hair and dark beard. He has shades of gray in his hair, yet his beard is now all gray, and not as long as his beard was in his heyday. Yet he is Kenny Loggins, looking older, and still able to perform his well-known songs and newer songs for his audiences. He will always be remembered as a successful and popular solo artists. His movie tunes would be his most remembered work. But he did have other great songs of his own. They are on this Greatest Hits compilation, and a taste of his later-year songs. All good.




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